Urbanization News June 17

ECA International, the world’s leader in the development and provision of solutions for the management and assignment of employees, around the world just release its international cost of living survey.  There were a few notable results, especially in Australia as Sydney rose from the 29th to 16th most expensive city and all major Australian cities rose up the ranking into the top 30. The most expensive city in the world remains Tokyo, Japan.

Top Ten most Expensive Cities in the World:

2011 rank

Location

Country

2010 rank

1
Tokyo
Japan
1
2
Oslo
Norway
2
3
Nagoya
Japan
4
4
Stavanger
Norway
6
5
Yokohama
Japan
5
6
Zurich
Switzerland
10
7
Luanda
Angola
3
8
Geneva
Switzerland
9
9
Kobe
Japan
7
10
Bern
Switzerland
11

Did you know that track trespassing is the largest cause of unnatural deaths in Mumbai?  In 2009 about 10 people per day died by being hit as they crossed the tracks.  To curb these dangerous, but often necessary treks across Mumbai’s train tracks an unorthodox experiment has been taking place as official made slight changes to the areas near the tracks with  India’s new Train Safety Campaign:

On the surface, the experiment involves small, odd changes. Certain railway ties have been painted bright yellow; a new kind of signboard has been installed near the tracks; engine drivers have modified the way they hoot their warning whistles. This modest tinkering has had dramatic results. In the six months before the experiment went live in December 2009, Wadala had recorded 23 track-crossing deaths, said M. C. Chauhan, a manager with the Central Railway’s Mumbai division. Between January and June 2010, that number had dropped to nine; in the next eight months, up until February 2011, only one death was registered. Read more from the Boston Globe.

High-Speed Trains in China to Run Slower I know many transportation junkies that are excited about the opening of the Beijing-Shanghai bullet train this summer, hopefully they will not be too disappointed by this weeks announcement that it will be running slower than expected:

China’s troubled Railway Ministry on Monday lowered the top operating speed for its flagship Beijing-to-Shanghai bullet train, which is set to open later this month, scaling down what was supposed to be a pinnacle of a transformed rail system that has become one of the country’s proudest and most ambitious domestic initiatives. The new line, once set to run at up to 236 miles per hour, will instead run trains at 186 and 155 miles per hour, the ministry announced. Read more from the New York Times.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: